The Japanese invasion of Malaya 1941

A landing beach at Kota Bharu

A landing beach at Kota Bharu

The Japanese invasion of Malaya was a very successful campaign against various units form the British Empire and Commonwealth, and the eventual defeat of them in a series a spectacular victories based on imaginative strategies, outflanking and making the best of captured equipment heralded the downfall of the British Empire.

The Japanese Outnumbered

Unknown to the defenders, the Japanese were outnumbered, but early success meant that total air superiority had been won by the invading forces within three days. The successful unloading of light tanks together together with thousands of bicycles meant that the push south for northern Malaya and Southern Thailand was swift.

Initial Landing on the east coast

The Japanese initial landings were on the eastern coast, but they quickly advanced to the west and with captured light vessels in Penang meant that more troops could outflank British positions, which by and large were based on the excellent road network.

Bicycles

Japanese bicycle troopsThe Japanese were keen to make use of the roads, especially their bicycle troops, and once their tyres had worn out or punctured they continued to ride on the rims, the noise confusing defending troops into thinking heavy armour was approaching, creating panic which became infectious.

Delaying tactics useless

Delaying tactics, such as blowing bridges proved useless the Japanese initially found altenative routes, and repairs were made within days.
British strategy was flawed being based on having a strong military base in Singapore, but even towards the outbreak of hostilities in 1941 it was already realised that a strong Singapore depended on a strong defence of the Malay peninsula.

Japanese versus British – different quality of troops

Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders in Malaya - one of the few allied units which had excellent jungle training and provided a stern defence

Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders in Malaya – one of the few allied units which had excellent jungle training and provided a stern defence

Lack of funding throughout the 1930’s was reinforced with the almost total neglect of providing adequate forces and supplies to the region after hostilities had started against the axis powers in Europe proved conclusive. Additionally, many of the allied forces, especially the high command, severely underestimated the quality of Japanese troops. Many of those invading had seen active service for several years in China – and most British troops had not even had adequate battle training, especially in the jungle.

Japanese gain swift control of the air

The sites of the HMS Prince of Wales and HMS Repulse are commemorated with a White Ensign on the sites of the vessels last resting place.

The sites of the HMS Prince of Wales and HMS Repulse are commemorated with a White Ensign on the sites of the vessels last resting place.

By 1941 French Indo China was controlled by a Vichy French regime assisting the Japanese, who occupied the French colonies so that Japanese aircraft could easily reach British Malaya using French airfields and bombers from various location in Cambodia and Vietnam sank the British warships HMS Repulse and HMS Prince of Wales which were sent on a useless mission to stop the Japanese invasion of northern Malaya and Southern Thailand.

The Japanese Occupation

The Japanese occupation started with mass round ups of Chinese, who were seen as sympathetic to the Kuomintang Government ( nationalist) and the Communists in mainland China, with whom they had been at war since 1937. Massacres followed.

Allies become enemies

Communist Chinese MalayansDuring the occupation guerilla warfare was carried out by British and Chinese forces, the latter being mainly communist, who after the Japanese surrender led the anti British forces in the Malayan Emergency, a bloody confrontation which continued after Malaysian independence in 1957.

Sites of battles and memorials can be found in many parts of the country.

 

 

For more information on this and other locations in South East Asia please contact DTC Travel


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The Japanese Invasion of S. Thailand and N. Malaya 1941.

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The battle of Kampar. The Japanese outflanked the strong British positions at Kampar by a landing in force by sea on the west coast south of British positions.

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The battle of the Slim River. This British defeat led to the loss of the Malayan mainland.

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